Meadows Blog

Meteorologists Predict a Snowy Winter for the Mountains

More than 350 people turned out for the Winter Weather Forecast Conference at OMSI - with the main draw local meteorologists and climatologists prediction of what weather winter will bring. Every presenter agreed that we'll see a return of La Nina this winter, bringing above average snowfall to the Cascades. They said it should be a good ski season - and former State Climatologist George Taylor even sang about it!


Friday, October 21: Windstorms, the Hurricanes of the Pacific NW

The week of October 16-22 is Winter Weather Awareness Week in the Pacific Northwest, including the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Each day, a new topic will be discussed, along with new informational links. This is republished with permission from the National Weather Forecast Office in Portland, OR.

The Pacific Northwest does not get hurricanes, but it does get hurricane force winds.

Across eastern Washington, eastern Oregon, Idaho and Montana:
In January 2008 a powerful wind storm in Walla Walla, WA and Milton Freewater, OR is a recent and striking example. Wind gusts exceeding 70 mph caused widespread damage. Hundreds of trees were downed, power lines were damaged, vehicles were blown off the road, and even houses were damaged during this event.

Across western Washington and western Oregon: The best example was the nation's strongest non-tropical windstorm ever---the Columbus Day storm of 1962. This storm produced hurricane force winds across western Oregon and Washington. Winds of 150 mph (category 4 hurricane force) winds rocked the coastal areas, killing 46 persons, injuring hundreds more and knocking out power for several million people. Damage was widespread, with buildings, schools and thousands of homes either destroyed or damage. Other notable windsstorms of the past: the Great Olympic Blowdown of 1921, the November 13th/15th 1981 Twin Wind Storms, the Inauguration Day storm of 1993, and most recently the Great Coastal Gale of December 2007.

Are you ready for the next windstorm?
Windstorms bring down trees and power lines, and produce much blowing debris. Falling trees and blowing debris cause the most fatalities.

Be sure to have your 3-day emergency preparedness kit ready at home, school and/or at work. This kit should include water and non-perishable food for each person, and AM/FM battery-powered radio, along with flashlights and extra batteries. Be sure to include vital medications, sleeping bags, blankets and warm clothing.

In addition, inspect your home and grounds each year for nearby trees that may fall and damage your home. Ensure the trees are healthy and trimmed, and you home, school or business is structurally sound. It is also a good idea to bring lightweight items in out of the weather, or tie them down. During strong gusty winds, such items can become dangerous missiles. These precautions will help ensure that you are ready for the next big blow.


    Additional Links of Interest...
  1. Pacific NW Windstorm Brochure (.pdf)
  2. Past Windstorms of Oregon, including Columbus Day Storm
  3. Historic Windstorm Photographs (mostly NW Oregon/SW Washington)
  4. Each local office may have photographs online (see office links below)


Remember, in times of hazardous winter weather, you can get all these vital NOAA/National Weather Service messages via NOAA Weather Radio, your favorite local media, or through NOAA's National Weather Service websites.

For questions about local Winter Weather Preparedness, contact your local NOAA National Weather Service Office:
local office contact by email contact by phone
Medford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067
Seattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6087
Spokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-6395
Pendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-4493
Portland Tyree Wilde 503-261-9246
Boise Jay Breidenbach 208-334-9861
Pocatello Vern Preston 208-233-0834
Missoula Marty Whitmore 406-329-4840

NOAA Confirms LA NINA Forecast - Wetter Colder Winter for the Northwest!

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its winter outlook for the months of December, January and February.

Although La Nina faded away this past summer, it is making a comeback and will play a role in the weather patterns across the country this winter.

Story: La Nina - Back to Back | The La Nina Signature

Precipitation Outlook: December - February

NOAA Precip

La Nina's influence on this winter outlook can be seen on the map above.

Blog archive: Oh No! La Nina is Coming!

Wetter-than-average conditions are forecast from the Pacific Northwest into the Northern Rockies and Northern Plains. The Pacific Northwest is one portion of the country that typically sees above-average precipitation during La Nina winters.

Temperature Outlook: December - February

NOAA Temps

The combination of below-average temperatures and above-average precipitation in the Pacific Northwest and western Montana could result in increased mountain snow.

Temperatures are forecast to stay below average from the Great Lakes westward to the Dakotas, Northern Rockies, Pacific Northwest and the coast of California.


La Nina isn't the only climate factor expected to play a role in the weather this winter.  NOAA cites the lesser known and less predictable Arctic Oscillation as a 'wild card' influence that could result in large short-term swings in temperatures this winter. According to Mike Halpert of NOAA, "The erratic Arctic Oscillation can generate strong shifts in the climate patterns that could overwhelm or amplify La Nina’s typical impacts.”

Read the entire article at The Weather Channel.


Thursday, October 20: Floods and Flash Floods

The week of October 16-22 is Winter Weather Awareness Week in the Pacific Northwest, including the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Each day, a new topic will be discussed, along with new informational links. This is republished with permission from the National Weather Forecast Office in Portland, OR.

During most winters, storms bring long periods of heavy rain and snow to the Pacific Northwest. In addition to extended rain, flooding can also occur due to ice jams, where large flows of ice pile up. This pile-up of ice can act like a dam, causing water to back up and flood. Warm weather can also cause snow on the middle and higher mountains to melt, putting more water into already rain-swollen streams.

Flooding causes more deaths and property damage in the U.S. than any other severe weather related event. The majority of flood related deaths occur when people become trapped in automobiles while attempting to drive through flooded areas. Flowing water can be deceptively strong, and pack a powerful punch. As little as six inches of water is enough to float a small car and carry it away. There have been many floods in the history of the Northwest, which include the devastating floods of December 1964 and February 1996. Most recently, in Dec 2007 and Jan 2009, significant flooding struck the Pacific Northwest, closing a twenty mile stretch of interstate 5 near Chehalis Washington under 10 feet of water. Coastal flooding can also occur during the winter months, and poses a threat to life and property. Winds generated from very strong Pacific storms can drive ocean water inland, much like a storm surge, and can cause significant flooding along the immediate coastal areas and estuaries.

A Flood refers to a gradual rise in the water along a stream or river over an extended period of time. Floods result from heavy rainfall, river ice jams, and snowmelt. They can erode an entire mountainside, roll boulders the size of trucks, tear out trees, destroy buildings, wash out roads and bridges, and cause the loss of lives. Rain weakened soils can also result in mudslides capable of closing major highways.

Flood Watch...
This means that flooding is possible within the watch area. You should remain alert and be ready to evacuate on a moment's notice.

Flood Warning...
This means that flooding has been reported, or is imminent. When a flood warning is issued for your area, act quickly to save yourself. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Go to higher ground, or climb to safetly. Move to a safe area before access is cut off by rising flood waters.

Nearly half of all flood fatalities are auto-related. Water that is two feet deep will carry away most automobiles. Never attempt to drive through a flooded roadway. The road bed may be washed out beneath the water, and you could be stranded or trapped. If the vehicle stalls, leave it immediately and seek higher ground.

The best advice if you are in a vehicle: TURN AROUND�Don't DROWN.


From the past...
Record Floods of December 1964 [some historical photos]
The December 1964 rainstorm was undoubtedly the most severe rainstorm to ever occur over central Oregon, and among the most severe over western Oregon since the late 1870s. Several observing stations across central Oregon recorded two-thirds of their normal annual rainfall in just 5 days. Scores of stations set new records for both 24-hour totals and December monthly rainfall totals. Widespread severe flooding occurred, with at least 30 major highway bridges receiving such damage as to make them unuseable! The new John Day multi-million dollar bridge was destroyed as were scores of bridges on county and secondary roads. Hundreds of miles of roads and highways were washed out or badly damaged. Thousands of people had to be evacuated due to ensuing floods.

The Willamette River at downtown Portland had a stage of 29.8 feet. This was a record high for the winter season, and was within inches of the peak stage during the Columbia River spring flood of 1948. Hundreds of homes and other buildings were destroyed and an even greater number were badly damaged. .Heavy snow followed by persistent heavy rains lead to record flooding in Oregon during the later half of December 1964 and January 1965. In all, 17 people died. Virtually every river in the state was far above flood stage and mudslides, bridge failures, and inundation closed the state's roads, airports, and railways. Reservoirs were overwhelmed early on in the storm and many proved unable to release water fast enough to prevent overtopping. Dorena Dam, south of Eugene had water flowing over the top more than 8 feet deep.

Read more information on this and other historic storms in Oregon.


    Additional Links of Interest...
  1. 1996 Flood Summary of Northwest Oregon/SW Washington
  2. Severe Emergency Plan for Inland Pacific NW Schools
  3. Each local office may have photographs online (see office links below)


Remember, in times of severe weather, you can get all these vital NOAA/National Weather Service messages via NOAA Weather Radio, your favorite local media, or through NOAA's National Weather Service websites.

For questions about local Severe Weather Preparedness, contact your local NOAA National Weather Service Office:

local office contact by email contact by phone
Medford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067
Seattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6087
Spokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-6395
Pendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-4493
Portland Tyree Wilde 503-261-9246
Boise Jay Breidenbach 208-334-9861
Pocatello Vern Preston 208-233-0834
Missoula Marty Whitmore 406-329-4840

Wednesday, October 19: Many Faces of Winter Storms

The week of October 16-22 is Winter Weather Awareness Week in the Pacific Northwest, including the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Each day, a new topic will be discussed, along with new informational links. This is republished with permission from the National Weather Forecast Office in Portland, OR.

Snow, Ice, Avalanche and Blizzards are the most common of Winter's many hazards.

Winter storms are a frequent occurence across the Pacific Northwest. Many of these storms bring snow amounts that cause road closures, especially through the mountain passes. Wind, in combination with the snow, can cause reduced visibility and deep snow drifts. Along with the heavy snow comes an avalanche threat in areas of steep terrain. In valley locations, temperatures may be near freezing during the day, but after the storm passes, temperatures plummet causing wet roadways to become ribbons of black ice. In some valleys, cool air trapped near the surface remains below freezing, while warmer air aloft drops rain through the sub-freezing air, causing glaze ice or freezing rain.

All of these hazards are forecast ahead of time by your local National Weather Service forecast office. Winter storm watches are generally issued 1 to 3 days prior to the storm's arrival. Winter storm warnings and ice storm warnings are issued within a day and sometimes two days's warning.

1) Winter Storm Warning...issued when any combination of freezing rain, sleet, wind and/or heavy snow occurs over an area that is expected to cause significant widespread damage. Snow amounts required for winter storm warnings vary, given the terrain and location. For low lying areas, which normally receive very little snow, only 2 to 4 inches of snow is required for a winter storm warning. On the other hand in mountainous areas, where nearly every storm brings at least 6 inches of snow, 8 to 10 inches (or more) of snow is required for a warning. A winter storm warning means that road crews will have difficulty keeping roads open and snow free, making travel difficult at best, and impossible at worst.

2) Blizzard Warning... is normally associated with severe winter weather in the northern plains where strong northwest winds bring snow and frigid temperatures. While rather common for the plains states, blizzard or near blizzard conditions can occur in the Pacific Northwest. The National Weather Service defines a blizzard as a combination of wind that is 35 mph or stronger accompanied by snow with visibilities frequently below one-quarter of a mile.

3) Ice Storm Warning... in the Pacific Northwest are infrequent, but can be extremely dangerous. Across interior locations, valley locations will have temperatures below freezing when a warm winter storm blows overhead. Rain falling out of the storm passes through the sub-freezing air near the surface and freezes on contact with objects. These conditions cause trees to snap, power lines to fall, and make roads nearly impossible to navigate.

4) Avalanche Warnings...
Avalanche Warnings are issued by the Northwest Avalanche Forecast Center, located in Seattle. These products are issued when there is a significant threat of avalanches in the Cascades and Olympics backcountry, possibly affecting mountain roadways and other high country interests. Also, see the NW Avalanche Center's website.

Thousands of avalanches occur each year in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest. With the popularity of winter sports, avalanches pose a great risk to skiers, hikers and snowmobilers. The risk is very real, as people die each year when sudden avalanches bury them. Avalanches can happen anywhere the slope is steep enough and has a heavy load of snow. They typically occur during or just after snowstorms and most occur on a slope of 30 to 45 degrees. By waiting 36 hours after a big snowstorm, you may allow the snow to settle. If you stay in the valleys away from avalanches chutes, in stands of dense trees, or on gentle slopes, you can minimize your risk to avalanches.

…AVALANCHE SAFETY RULES…
1) NEVER TRAVEL ALONE. Always have one or more companions. If you are alone, and get trapped by an avalanche, you may not be found until April or May.

2) If crossing a slope that may be prone to avalanches, do it one person at a time. You want to minimize the impact on your party if an avalanche occurs.

WHEN WINTER STORMS THREATEN…AVOID TRAVEL IF AT ALL POSSIBLE. ROAD CREWS WORK HARD TO KEEP ROADS OPEN…STUCK CARS ONLY MAKE THEIR JOB HARDER.



    Additional Links of Interest...
  1. 1996 Flood Summary of Northwest Oregon/SW Washington
  2. Top 10 Weather Events of the 1900s for Oregon
  3. Top 10 Weather Events of the 1900s for Washington
  4. Each local office may have other historical data and photographs online (see office links below)

Remember, in times of hazardous winter weather, you can get all these vital NOAA/National Weather Service messages via NOAA Weather Radio, your favorite local media, or through NOAA's National Weather Service websites.

For questions about local Winter Weather Preparedness, contact your local NOAA National Weather Service Office:
local office contact by email contact by phone
Medford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067
Seattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6087
Spokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-6395
Pendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-4493
Portland Tyree Wilde 503-261-9246
Boise Jay Breidenbach 208-334-9861
Pocatello Vern Preston 208-233-0834
Missoula Marty Whitmore 406-329-4840

Tuesday, October 18: Watch, Warning, or Advisory? What do they mean?

The week of October 16-22 is Winter Weather Awareness Week in the Pacific Northwest, including the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Each day, a new topic will be discussed, along with new informational links. This is republished with permission from the National Weather Forecast Office in Portland, OR.

ARE YOU READY FOR WINTER WEATHER ?

A goal of the National Weather Service is to provide information on winter storms, with enough advance notice to allow the whole community to take actions needed to prepare for and deal with adverse and sometimes dangerous weather conditions. As the threat of severe winter weather draws closer, and the confidence in the location and timing of the event increases, the National Weather Service will issue various bulletins that become increasingly more specific. Here is what these bulletins mean, and what precautions you should take:

NOAA's National Weather Service uses a four-tier approach to alert the public for the potential for severe weather or high fire danger. This four-tier approach consists of outlooks, advisories, watches and warnings.

1) Winter Storm Outlook...
A winter storm outlook is issued when conditions are favorable for hazardous winter weather to develop within the next 3 to 7 days. It is intended for those groups that require considerable lead time to prepare for the event.

ACTION: Stay tuned to local media or monitor NOAA Weather Radio for updates. Evaluate your emergency action plan and the resources you have in your home, car or work place to deal with a winter storm.

2) Winter Storm Watch...
A winter storm watch is issued when the risk of hazardous winter weather has increased, but occurrence, location and timing is still somewhat uncertain. Generally, a watch is issued when there is a significant threat of severe winter weather in the next 12 to 48 hours.

ACTION: You should prepare now and ensure that all emergency plans and resources are in place.
Note: Winter Storm Watches may be upgraded to Winter Storm Warnings, if conditions warrant.

3) Winter Weather Advisory...
Winter weather advisories are issued for less serious winter weather conditions that are occurring, or have a high likelihood of occurring. These products are used for winter weather situations that are less severe than a Warning, but will cause significant inconvenience. These situations should not be life threatening, damage is usually localized and the main danger is hazardous travel.
Note: This advisory may be upgraded to a Winter Storm Warning if conditions warrant.

4) Winter Storm Warning...
A winter storm warning is issued when a hazardous winter weather event is occurring, imminent, or has a very high probability of occurrence. Warning products are used for conditions that pose a threat to life or property. Winter Storm warnings are issued for several types of hazardous winter weather, including heavy snow, sleet, or a combination of snow and wind.

ACTION: YOU SHOULD ACT NOW. STAY INDOORS IF POSSIBLE UNTIL THE STORM ENDS. LIMIT TRAVEL TO ONLY WHAT IS ESSENTIAL.

5) Ice Storm Warning...
An ice storm warning is issued when freezing rain will accumulate at a rate that causes a coating of ice that will make outdoor activities dangerous. Tree limbs and power lines fall under the weight of the ice. These conditions are fairly rare but, when they occur, can be especially dangerous.

6) Blizzard Warning...
Blizzard warnings are issued when:
  • There are sustained wind speeds of 35 mph or more, or frequents wind gusts of 35 mph or more.
  • Considerable falling and/or blowing snow is occurring, reducing visibility to less then 1/4 of a mile.

7) Dangerous Wind Chill Warning...
Wind chill warnings are issued when the wind chill of -20 degrees or colder are expected or occurring and:

8) Avalanche Warning...
Avalanche warnings are issued by the Northwest Avalanche Forecast Center, located in Seattle. These products are issued when there is a significant threat of avalanches in the Cascades and Olympics backcountry, possibly affecting mountain roadways and other high country interests.
[For more info, see the NW Avalanche Center's website]


    Additional Links of Interest...
  1. NOAA's Weather Safety website
  2. Preparedness for Severe Weather
  3. Each local office may have historic storm data and photographs online (see office links below)


Remember, in times of hazardous winter weather, you can get all these vital NOAA/National Weather Service messages via NOAA Weather Radio, your favorite local media, or through NOAA's National Weather Service websites.

For questions about local Winter Weather Preparedness, contact your local NOAA National Weather Service Office:
local office contact by email contact by phone
Medford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067
Seattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6087
Spokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-6395
Pendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-4493
Portland Tyree Wilde 503-261-9246
Boise Jay Breidenbach 208-334-9861
Pocatello Vern Preston 208-233-0834
Missoula Marty Whitmore 406-329-4840

Monday, October 17: Winter Weather Safety and Terminology

The week of October 16-22 is Winter Weather Awareness Week in the Pacific Northwest, including the states of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Each day, a new topic will be discussed, along with new informational links. This is republished with permission from the National Weather Forecast Office in Portland, OR.

Exposure to cold can cause frostbite or hypothermia, and become life-threatening. Infants and the elderly are the most susceptible. When a winter storm approaches, stay inside, or seek shelter if caught outdoors.

Other tips to follow to better protect you and others:

  • When using an alternate heat from a fireplace, wood stove or space heater, be sure to use fire safeguards and properly ventilate. Close off unneeded rooms in the building. Stuff towels or rags in cracks and under doors.
  • Cover windows at night to minimize loss of heat through the windows.
  • Eat and drink sufficient amounts of water. Food provides the body with energy for producing its own heat. Fluids prevent dehydration.
  • Wear layers of loose fitting, lightweight and warm clothing. Remove layers to avoid overheating and perspiration and subsequent chill.
  • Make sure pets have plenty of food, water and proper shelter from the elements.


  • If caught outdoors:
  • Find shelter immediately.
  • Try to stay dry, and cover all exposed body parts.
  • In no shelter is available, build a lean-to, windbreak, or a snow cave to protect yourself from the wind
  • Build a fire for heat and to attract attention for rescue.
  • Place rocks around the fire to absorb and reflect heat.
  • Melt snow for drinking water.
  • Avoid eating snow, as this will lower your body temperature.


  • If traveling:
  • This best way to avoid becoming stranded or stuck during a winter storm is to avoid travel during the storm.
  • Stay informed on the current weather, forecasts and warnings.
  • Obtain the latest warnings and forecasts from your NOAA Weather Radio, The National Weather Service website [ http://weather.gov ], or your favorite media news source.
  • If you must travel, let someone else ( who is not traveling ) know of your travel plans.
  • Weatherize your vehicle now, before rough winter weather arrives. Make sure your vehicle safety set includes: adequate tires, chains, tow rope, sand or cat litter for traction, shovel, tool kit, windshield scraper and brush, battery cables, first aid kit, flashlight and extra batteries, a blanket or sleeping bag, extra clothes, waterproof matches, high-calorie snacks and an empty can to melt snow for drinking water.


  • If you become stranded while traveling:
  • STAY WITH YOUR VEHICLE, and do not panic.
  • If with other people, take turns sleeping.
  • Run the motor every hour for about 10 minutes to maintain warmth, but keep window open a bit to prevent buildup of carbon monoxide.
  • Make sure the exhaust pipe is not blocked by snow.
  • Keep a brightly colored cloth tied to the antenna, in order for others to find your car.
  • Exercise periodically by vigorously moving arms, legs, toes and fingers.

  • In the Mountains and higher Terrain:
    Avalanches become a possibility during the winter, especially below steep slopes. Avalanches occasionally come down across roads, with little or no warning. Caution is advised when travelling along avalanche prone roads, especially after heavy snow has fallen or during periods of rapid snowmelt.

    Roads which appear clear in the wintertime may actually be coated with a thin layer of ice, commonly called black ice. This nearly invisible ice layer can cause you to rapidly lose control of your vehicle. Black ice is most common during the nighttime hours into very early morning. If you detect black ice, reduce your speed!

    Cold and its Effects on You:
    Wind Chill: this is not the actual temperature, but rather how wind and cold combined feel on exposed skin. As the wind increases, heat is carried away from the body at an accelerated rate, thus lowering your body temperature. Animals are also affected by wind chill, but cars, plants and other objects are not.

    Frostbite: this is damage to body tissue due to exposure to extreme cold. A wind chill of -20 degrees Fahrenheit will cause frostbite in just 30 minutes. Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance in extremities such as fingers, toes, ears and even the tip of your nose. If symptons are detected, get medical help immediately. If you must wait for help, slowly re-warm the affected areas. If the person is also showing signs of hypothermia, warm the body core before the extremities.

    Hypothermia: this is a condition brought on when the body temperatures drops to less than 95 degrees Fahrenheit. It can kill. For those who survive, there are likely to be lasting kidney, liver and pancreas problems. Warning signs include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness and apparent exhaustion. Take the person's temperature, and if it is below 95F, seek medical care immediately.



    Remember, in times of severe weather, you can get all these vital NOAA/National Weather Service messages via NOAA Weather Radio, your favorite local media, or through NOAA's National Weather Service websites.

    For questions about local Severe Weather Preparedness, contact your local NOAA National Weather Service Office:
    local office contact by email contact by phone
    Medford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067
    Seattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6087
    Spokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-6395
    Pendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-4493
    Portland Tyree Wilde 503-261-9246
    Boise Jay Breidenbach 208-334-9861
    Pocatello Vern Preston 208-233-0834
    Missoula Marty Whitmore 406-329-4840

    Four New Snowcats Arrive at Meadows Including the Bison X Freestyle Terrain Groomer

    Our four new snowcats arrived Tuesday on a day when wintry rain transitioned into snow. Three of the Prinoth cats are BR-350s - the workhorse of our grooming fleet that you've seen us use for several years. Grooming Manager Rob Gayman describes the BR-350 as a workhorse, reliable and powerful capable of tackling the extreme weather and conditions.

    Our new snowcat is the Bixon X - set up to specialize in freestyle terrain grooming. Additional maneuverability of both the front blade and rear tiller will help dial in the transitions, particularly on more irregularly shaped features, making park building and maintenance faster while improving the product, according to Freestyle Terrain Park Manager Jason Stankevich. It's also more fuel efficient, making it greener. Here's Jason to tell you all about the Bison X!

    HPC and Outer Limits Sports

    Outer Limits Sports Designed for Our Elements

     We've been receiving the new 2012 product at our retail shops and our staff is absolutely stoked about telling you about it. Outer Limits Sports manager Allison Wright is bringing in more local (Oregon and NW based companies) because in many cases their products perform better in our climate and weather conditions on Mt. Hood. Having the right jacket, pants, base layers and accessories can make an otherwise marginal (or stormy) weather day a great experience. Some of the best riding happens when the weather isn't blue bird. It's also a more sustainable approach doing business locally.

    HPC - All About Customizing

    At the High Performance Center it's all about customizing your equipment selection and fit to the terrain and surface conditions you want. The boot lab was hugely successful last year in its initial season - so much so that we're sending additional techs to Master Fit school this fall. It's amazing what a custom fit can do for comfort and performance - it all pretty much starts with the boot. The knowledge our staff brings to your selection is key - they get on this equipment and test it in all kinds of different weather and conditions. They know what performs ideally - talk to other guests who demo as well as our pro instructional staff. You receive the benefit of this local knowledge to make the most of the time you spend skiing or riding at Meadows.

    Tech Talks

    With that in mind, we are pleased to present Tech Talks this season - our HPC and Outer Limits staff talking to you about their gear favorites. Check out this blog, as well as our retail sport shop specials page for updates throughout the season. Check out these series of videos in the player below talking about specific products in the shops which are staff believes will improve your enjoyment and performance at Meadows.

    Passholders get 20% off in October

     A reminder to season passholders that you will receive a one-time 20% off your purchase of $200 or more in October. The shops are open Tuesdays - Saturdays from 9 AM - 3 PM, but you can make personal shopping appointments with our staff. Get more details here.

    HPC Guarantees Best Price on Ski & Snowboard Equipment

    1. 30 Day Price Protection.  We guarantee you will never over pay in the High Performance Center.  If you find any ski or snowboard you purchased in stock for less anywhere in Oregon within 30 days, we’ll refund you the difference.
    2. The Lifetime HPC Guarantee.  Every Ski and Snowboard purchased from the High Performance Center comes with our exclusive ‘HPC Guarantee.’  When you need a snowboard binding adjustment, ski binding DIN adjustment or quick wax, we will provide those services for free as long as you own your gear.
    3. 30 Day Test Ride.  To guarantee you have purchased the perfect pair of skis or the best board….ride it for 30 days.  If during that time you are not completely satisfied with the product, return it undamaged within 30 days and we will apply the credit from the original purchase to the purchase of another ski or snowboard from the HPC.

    First Snow Baptizes Stadium Express

    The first snow always brings a chill of excitement to the mountain. While we know we won't be building our base out of an October 6 snowfall, the flurries signal a change of seasons and heightens our anticipation of the oncoming winter. The snow arrived as crews installed the bottom terminal of the new Stadium Express chairlift, Meadows sixth high speed quad and the second serving the base area. Amazingly today's efforts accomplished everything but enclosing the terminal with its cover, which is scheduled for Friday. Great progress - as we ready the lift to open when the snow allows. Enjoy the video!